Posts Tagged "Matt Harvey"

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Matt Harvey’s Latest Nemesis: A Scapula Stress Injury

When the Mets’ Matt Harvey left the game last Wednesday after 58 pitches over four innings, he complained of a tired arm. An MRI and CT scan led to the diagnosis of a stress injury in his right scapula (shoulder blade). Though some media reports assumed the injury to be a “broken bone”, SI.com noted that Harvey had sustained a “stress reaction”. They are not one and the same.

UCL Rehab Can’t Be Rushed: Listen Up Matt Harvey!

Flickr-8006476237Healing takes time and the body can’t be rushed. Feeling good without the demands of an activity likely to offend is not a predictor of ultimate success. Not even a little. Though his musculature can be coaxed back to full capacity, Harvey’s new ligament isn’t likely to be at full strength until October. Rushing through a throwing program and pitching too often, at high velocities and at full capacity won’t hasten his recovery but will prove to stress his new UCL beyond its capacity. Unless he’d like to face a revision surgery down the road – perhaps sooner than later – Harvey would be wise to take direction from his medical team without a fight.

Another Pitcher Down – Bobby Parnell’s Partial UCL Tear

imgresAfter hearing that Mets’ closer, 29 year-old Bobby Parnell, was diagnosed with an incomplete medial collateral ligament (MCL) tear in his right elbow, one jumps to the logical conclusion that surgery is in his immediate future. That is especially so with a team physician – Dr. David Altchek – who pioneered a very successful modification of the original Tommy John procedure.

The first thing to realize is that the medial collateral ligament of the elbow is also known as the ulnar collateral ligament – or UCL – because of its attachments to the humerus and ulna at the inner (medial) elbow. Now that you know that, the first thought of any Mets’ fan might be that Matt Harvey recently succumbed to surgery to address the same injury (though perhaps the extent of the tears is not identical). Both men complained of primary symptoms in the forearm.

Matt Harvey resisted the knife initially and now, evidently, Parnell is following suit. The Mets tweeted that after having a Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injection, Parnell will rest for two weeks before beginning a throwing program, after which it will be determined whether surgery will be required.

Well, what do you think the outcome will be?

Matt Harvey's Fall League Paradox

imagesMets ace Matt Harvey has been out since the end of August with a partial ligament tear in his right elbow.

He might pitch in the Arizona Fall League, according to general manager Sandy Alderson, to see if he can avoid Tommy John surgery. That is if it is determined he is actually eligible to compete, having possibly exceeded the maximum timeframe allotted for those already in the majors.

It is an interesting proposition and one that I’d like to take a moment to dissect. Having thoroughly assessed both Harvey’s injury and his recovery to date, the Mets’ medical staff may have two very different reasons for encouraging Harvey to pitch sooner rather than later.

Matt Harvey’s Partial Tear: Surgery Now Or Chance It?

imagesIf Matt Harvey were an everyday guy pitching in a Central Park League and he opted to try conservative management after partially tearing his ulnar collateral ligament (UCL), we wouldn’t give it a second thought.

With an uncertain outcome either way – and greater overall risks with surgery – what would he have to lose? It wouldn’t be as though his livelihood depended on the result. And, after all, if rehab alone didn’t wind up being the answer, surgery could be done later than sooner. The primary downside would be time spent or, depending on how you look at it, time lost.

My point exactly. It also appears to be a point made by Mets’ management, though the choice has rightly been left to the All Star.

Understanding Matt Harvey's Partial UCL Tear

imagesThe extraordinary stresses that pitchers place on the medial (inner) elbow – and the excessive loading of the region – can create inflammatory or degenerative conditions in a number of structures in the area. That may explain why Harvey’s symptoms were not initially localized to the UCL, which is the primary stabilizer of the elbow.

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